MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS

 

Motorcycles are a popular mode of transportation. But, they offer low protection to riders. They can also reach high speeds. Because of these things, they can get involved in serious accidents. They are among the most dangerous vehicles to drive. If you get involved in a motorcycle accident, there are a few important steps to take. This can ensure that if you get injured, you will get compensated for.

Determining Fault

Determining fault in a motorcycle accident can seem complicated. One important factor that determines negligence is if you were wearing a helmet or not. If you get involved in a motorcycle accident, and you are not wearing a helmet, it could complicate the case. You might be wondering if you can file a personal injury claim. Every state has different helmet laws. The way that your choice to wear a helmet or not wear a helmet may affect your case in Connecticut is related to how responsible you were for your injuries.

Helmet Laws

There is no universal helmet law in the state of Connecticut for motorcycle or bike riders. In Connecticut, you are only legally required to wear a helmet if you are 17 years old or younger. So, if you get into an accident and are not wearing a helmet, you are not breaking any laws in Connecticut. This is the case unless you are age 17 or younger. But, failure to wear a helmet can make your injuries worse. The defense might try to prove that you were at least partly responsible for your injuries. They will claim that this is the case because you didn’t wear a helmet.

In the case of motorcycle or bike accidents, your helmet use might influence your case, or it might not. If you were not wearing a helmet, and you can prove that it is irrelevant to your case, you can still file a personal injury claim. Examples of helmet use being irrelevant are:

  • Injuries that are not head related, such as a sprained ankle or broken arm.
  • If the accident was so bad that it would not have made a difference if you wore a helmet.

But, if you suffered a traumatic brain injury or another head injury, the defense might blame you. They will try to prove that you were partially liable for your injuries by not wearing a helmet.

Am I At Fault?

Personal injury cases can hinge on whether or not you properly followed the helmet rules. You must prove that if you were not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident, this did not cause you to be negligent. Only after doing this can you prove that the defendant is liable for your injuries.

Any automobile accident can be frightening, and motorcycle accidents can be particularly traumatic. If you have a motorcycle license, make sure that you have umbrella insurance coverage. Also get underinsured motorist conversion coverage. With these types of insurance coverage, you will be fully covered in the event of an accident. The law doesn’t require motorcyclists to get medical benefit coverage or No-Fault coverage. But it is still in your best interest to do so. Having a plan and following these steps can help you handle a motorcycle accident in the best way.